SANGIRAN

SANGIRAN

 Sangiran is located 15 km from Surakarta. It is a village located 17 Km north of Solo, on the road to Purwodadi. It is an important place for Pithecanthropus Erectus, the pre-historic Java man. It is fossilized land of prehistoric living things. The Pleistocene Museum keeps some skills of the erectus, fossils of plants and animals. Sangiran and other places such as Wajak (near Tulungangung) and Trinil (near Ngawi) are significant places for human evolution/theory. It is interesting place for scientific tourism in the field of geology, anthropology and archeology. Many experts came to this site to do some research and study among other; Van Es (1939), Duyfyes (1936), Van Bemmelen (1937), Van Koeningswald (1938), Sartono (1960), Suradi (1962) and Otto Sudarmaji (1976). Van Koeningswald said that more than five different types of hominoid fossils have been found in Sangiran, it was incredible. There is no other place in the world like Sangiran. The Sangiran fossils are very various, they were earth as well as sea fossils. There was a possibility that island of Java was erected from the bottom of sea million years ago.

The story of Java Man begins over a century ago. In 1890, a Dutch military physician and paleontologist Eugene Dubois discovered a fossilized primate jawbone at Trinil further east down the Solo river. This jawbone possessed distinctly human characteristics. Dubois was convinced that this was Darwin’s “missing link” in the evolution of man but lacked the evidence to prove his theory.

Nearly 50 years later, Berlin born paleontologist G H R von Koenigswald, unearthed a fossilized ‘java man’ or homo erectus jawbone in Sangiran. This was a much older fossil, dating back over a million years or more. Dubois was right. Java man was the proof he had needed that homo erectus existed in Java about as early as in Africa. Today, scientists recognize that homo erectus, which inhabited the earth between 1.7 million to 250,000 years ago, are the direct ancestors of homo sapiens (modern human beings).

It’s believed that Java man probably made his home in caves or in open camps and it’s likely that he was the first humanoid that used fire. He also used stone axes and hand-adzes, most of which were discovered by the Baksoka River near Pacitan.

The Sangiran area is rich in fossils of all types. Along with Indonesia’s temples of Borobudur and Prambanan, Sangiran’s significance means it has been recognized by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site. 

 

Sumber : http://www.indonesia.travel/en/destination/422/sangiran

http://www.indonesia-tourism.com/central-java/sangiran.html

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